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February 8, 2023

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Ron Millett (Author)January 31, 2014

Travis comment: "private opinion ... not shared by all church members." Certainly a good clarification. "There are certainly many Latter-day saints who join other people of faith in applauding the defense of being able to freely discuss and teach scriptural accounts of the creation in schools as was done throughout most of US history." -RM

TravisJanuary 29, 2014

"Latter-day saints join other people of faith in applauding the defense of being able to freely discuss and teach scriptural accounts of the creation in schools as was done throughout most of US history." My primary objection to this statement is that it sounds as if it is the official position of the LDS Church, when in fact it is the private opinion of whoever wrote it and, as noted by another commentator, is not shared by all church members. A clarifying statement/retraction would be in order.

Ron Millett (author)January 28, 2014

Chris: "the origin of life story as told by anyone's Holy writ cannot be taught in a natural science class." In our current confused state regarding what "establishment of religion" means, the Wiccan view would probably be given the same billing as Christian bringing just more confusion to the class. But, consider schools a half century or so ago where a Bible discussion and its wisdom was appropriate in any class along with other books and views. Science today hasn't a clue as to the origin of the cell or how it was started except some hand waving. Yet, we walk on eggshells in fear of a lawsuit if we were to open the scriptures at that point and have a detailed discussion. I found a reference to a Native American quote that the Great Spirit gives life to all things. At that level of the "American religion" promoted by Benjamin Franklin, surely we should avoid atheism being established as the state religion in our schools, both public and sadly many private ones as well. At BYU, in my courses in Computer Science and Linguistics, a scriptural discussion was appropriate in any class. Our public schools did not used to be as they are today, with religious or scriptural discussion crippled and cubby holed.

Robert SlavenJanuary 27, 2014

We humans generally seek and find truth in two ways; through faith, and through reason. Real truth will come through in both ways. That being said, the evidence for a 13.8-billion-year-old universe and a 4.5-billion-year-old earth is overwhelming, while any evidence for an earth that's only a few thousand years old is non-existent, outside a very LITERAL reading of scripture which we Mormons, at least, have been told is very much symbolic in many ways. I don't see why so many people have such a hard time accepting a kind of "middle position" such as mine: Why not believe that God indeed took billions of years to create our planet? To me, that makes His act of creation even MORE awe-inspiring, recognizing the ENORMOUS amount of work and planning necessary to prepare a planet upon which He could "bring to pass the immortality and eternal life of man." As for evolution, again, the idea that God took billions of years to create all of the life on this earth preparatory to introducing His children to earth is, again, amazing and awe-inspiring to me. We don't know how the random mutations that lead to evolution happen; it could be cosmic rays, or it could be God's finger stirring things up as required. As for schools, teach kids the science of cosmology and evolution in the science classroom, and save the creation stories for the Sunday School classroom.

ChrisJanuary 27, 2014

Ronald, the origin of life story as told by anyone's Holy writ cannot be taught in a natural science class. Everything taught in a science class follows the basic outline of the scientific method, and simply put, any creation story fails the test, whether it's fundamental Christian, LDS, Hindu, or another of the hundreds of varieties. By its essence, one cannot prove God's existence, therefore, one can't include Him in the science class. I do think that religion definitely has a place in our schools, but let's offer those classes as religion classes.

John TaberJanuary 27, 2014

"Latter-day saints join other people of faith in applauding the defense of being able to freely discuss and teach scriptural accounts of the creation in schools as was done throughout most of US history." This Latter-day Saint would find that very inappropriate, especially considering that other Christians might have views of the Creation that would sharply conflict with our own.

Jim JenkinsJanuary 27, 2014

Isn't it interesting that secularists limit God to the technologies known to man in our day? We have so little understanding of the universe, dimensions of time and space, and the forces that govern even our own earth. When we fully understand these principles (not in this life) there will be no contradiction between science and the scriptures. If we asked the public in 1830 how long it would take to travel around the world by the fastest means, the answer would be quite different than one offered only two hundred years later. Man in his arrogance seeks to limit God to man's understanding and power. Wouldn't it be ironic if the reward in the eternities for those who discount scriptural accounts of the creation and miracles would be that they are eternally limited to 21st Century technology in their progression?

Julie January 27, 2014

looking forward to watching the debate. great to have the topic discussed. just watched the documentary expelled. so good!

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