Comments | Meridian Magazine

Sign up for our newsletter

   

Signed up, but still not getting our newsletter? Click here.

 

June 26, 2022

Comments | Return to Story

H PelessFebruary 7, 2022

I'm not sure why you claim women never sit in ward councils. In every ward I've served in, women have sat in council, led the important discussions, and often took lead in solving problems. I can't imagine I've been that lucky to be in unique wards. There is no way, I as a man, can do all the Lord's work without the compassion and empathy and sheer abilities of the women I am called to serve with and around. I gr up i n home were Mother was truly a Help Meet for Father and was every bit as important in our wards. Her example and service have been proof women are a vital component to everything we do as a Church. You sisters have more power than you realize, and more Christ-like attributes than most men could hope to gain. I doubt my experiences are unique, or that I've been in perfect wards. The contrary, many of the wards I've been in are small, struggling, and full of single mothers or only the woman is a member families. These women have been rock stars of service and leadership.

KA MillerJanuary 25, 2022

In the many Ward Councils I have recently attended, the Women who are present dominate the dialog, and propose most of the actions to be taken. And, this has been the case for a number of years through three different Bishoprics and three different Stake Presidencies. Am I living in an unusual place?

Sasha W KwapinskiJanuary 25, 2022

One factor which helps me to better understand this matter is the fact that the LDS priesthood is a priesthood of the laity. This is rather obvious actually, but many observers seem to miss it. In most other denominations which have a Priesthood, it is a comparatively small, select body of men, who are separate and distinct from the laity by years of theological and seminary training. In our church, however, being ordained to the priesthood does not separate one out from the laity. An LDS priesthood holder is, and remains, a layman. As a single father who raised my children alone during most of their growing up years, I can testify to the importance and value of women, partly from the active welcoming, care and involvement which my children received from many of the women in my ward.

LaFonda MerrickJanuary 25, 2022

I don't know if "women are more spiritually minded than men" is true. It's really not for me to say, but I am grateful I have always known of my Father in Heaven's love for me as his daughter. As a strong female business leader, I am often asked about my "not having the priesthood" and have tried to explain many of the same reasoning in this article. Women are different, not less. Men are different, not less. We all have something to learn on earth. Great article.

Joe BrightJanuary 25, 2022

This is one of the most powerful articles I have ever read, clear, based on fact and solid reason in a great time of need. We may not have all the answers but we do have enough. We know that our heavenly father is one of absolute love. He loves his children and has an absolutely special place in his heart for his daughters, who mirror his mate, and so should we. If we as men do not embrace this fully we fall short. This is enough for me. I will do everything I can to promote this confidence and the care it instills in me for my sisters and brothers. The pain in the world is the enemy to our peace. Let us take refuge in the love of our father. Thank you!

Colleen AndersonJanuary 25, 2022

Thank you for posting this article.

Kate PhoenixJanuary 25, 2022

Excellent article! Well spoken. This has been a hot topic the past 18 years of my life as I have researched and studied what my Priestesshood means to me. I believe that this mortal life started with a woman (Eve) and will end with us women coming to the knowledge that our church culture is just that, a skewed version of personal beliefs, rather than actual the doctrine of Elohim's Priesthood (Their Priesthood).

Sandy DildineJanuary 25, 2022

This was a great article that opened my eyes to the problem that the younger generation of women has with church leadership issues. It is a product of the current culture and women's own feelings of inadequacy that take confidence to overcome. I am a female temple ordinance worker and agree that women have Priesthood Power. There is work enough to do for everyone in God's kingdom and women tend to step up and do it. Men having a different role than women is not because women aren't capable. Women have the role of nurturing and teaching and leading also in many capacities. Wanting the spotlight is very different than wanting to serve...

John R CarpenterJanuary 25, 2022

This article is something that all members of the Chruch need to read or to be aware of. I will reccomend the principles of this subject be taught in Priesthood and leadership meetings.

Carol KendallJanuary 25, 2022

Wow! I have NEVER seen this issue expressed so clearly - and from a position of faith! I have faced these concerns since my marriage in the mid-‘70s, relying solely upon my faith in the Restoration. I’m so glad my daughters and friends can be strengthened by your perspectives.

Harold RustJanuary 25, 2022

It is always helpful to be guided through the process of gaining insight into the perspectives that another individual may have regarding an experience that can look very different to them than it does to you. Thank you for that insight. As a male priesthood holder, I developed my own explanation for why men only hold priesthood keys: I simply visualized what the Church would be like if men didn't feel a special need to attend Church, to visit other members, and to stand in front of the Congregation each Sunday and administer the Sacrament: from my perspective and limited experience, the result would be a Church with women doing all the work and most of the men out enjoying a game of golf or out fishing. Women seem to be more spiritually inclined on their own while men need others expecting them to be spiritual before they rise to that full involvement. Whether my view is actually correct or not, it has always been my guide to recognize a Priesthood calling is given to me to make me a better person than I would otherwise be while women seem far more inclined to do that without being called. When my wife asks for a Priesthood blessing, it boosts my spiritual awareness so that it just might approach the level of her faith. I think she also feels that.

T. LarsenJanuary 25, 2022

This is an excellent article. I have been pondering how I can contribute to creating feelings of equality and inclusion for sisters in the church. Small ideas have come, like thanking God in public prayers for the service of relief society and other female presidencies instead of always thanking Him for the bishopric and other male leaders. Your article has given me great additional food for thought. Thank you!

Ricki GibbonsJanuary 25, 2022

This article was not just for the men. I have had difficulty understanding why some women struggle with the things this article discusses. It was “not my baby”. I intend to print this off and refer to it and study it. Thank you!

RobertJanuary 25, 2022

This is a wonderful article. My wife and I went through a somewhat similar child story, other than ours began shortly after we where married. I’m not sure if it is common as it used to be, however it became rather stressful and depressing to my wife. We would often get the question of when are you going to have children. I found it quite unsettling as when we first attended church together shortly after we began dating. Many of the comments upon introducing her, and yes, you probably guessed it had something to do with tying the knot. I’m sure many have gone through it before. “When, where, how”, or one that would really irritate me was the “Are You going to get married.” The times it was the first thing out of someone’s lips, I should of introduced her as my sister or cousin. We did get married about two and a half years later. Like I said my wife would get depressed when asked about children, especially as it was a few years before we had a child as my wife had severe endometriosis which can narrow the chance to have children for some. She struggled with her emotional mentality as the years went by trying to have another especially when her sisters or she would see others with newborns. When someone would ask about having more was even worse than before our daughter was born. It was about 14 years later when she became pregnant again. We were so happy, especially my daughter as she was excited to have a baby brother or sister. Then came the day she miscarried. It just about destroyed her. She eventually would have to have a hysterectomy to get rid of the endometriosis. Today it’s still difficult to look back sometimes, Her patriarchal blessing states she would bare and raise more children and we accept that as knowing that we still have an opportunity during the millennium to still have and raise more and hopefully get the chance to meet and be with our son. I say son as my daughter really wanted a brother and my wife, daughter, and I hold onto the faith and believe it. I realize the questions about marriage or children may not affect others as much even if that at all, however they are still questions I myself may hesitate or attempt to ask someone right off the bat or at least choose how and when is the right way or time or if it is a question that is really necessary to ask or possibly even know at all.

ADD A COMMENT

  • INSPIRATION FOR LIVING A LATTER-DAY SAINT LIFE

    Daily news, articles, videos and podcasts sent straight to your inbox.